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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
foreign officials, that being detectives at scotland yard, it's a violation of that act. we most frequently see that act being prosecuted with companies opening up plants or supply lines in third world countries and the brother of a prince or son-in-law of a queen gets a contract, basically a bribe, something that's prosecuted here mostly with large corporations doing things like that, but the facts do fit for news corp., if they bribed people at scotland yard to prosecute them in the u.s. >> how serious is the violation of a foreign practices act, something the sort of thing that could have more problems for a company? >> could have more problems, people could go to jail depending on how high you can show there was authorization to violate the act, but the corporation could be put into a monitorship for a period of time as we've seen with wall street companies over the years. they could actually make the company -- have the company lose its charter if they wanted to, but i'd like to move away from the criminal for a second, our federal communications, our fcc has also incredible
that scotland yard has made an arrest in the scandal that has rocked rupert murdoch's media empire and yet another remainor how serious the hacking investigation is. london's top police officer faces a public grilling today. dan rivers is on that for us. dan, what do you think? >> reporter: paul stevenson, the top policeman in the uk, is being questioned at the moment by the metropolitan police authority. particularly coming under pressure because, this morning, they arrested a former deputy editor i "the news of the world" neil wallace, arrest number nine as part of this and the other inquiry into corrupt or bribing police officials for information. now, the important thing is here is already we know one of the senior policemen in scotland yard john yates has already admitted having lunches with neil wallace, the man now arrested. a lot of pressure on one senior policeman, john yates, therefore, top pleasure on the top policemen. rupert and james murdoch are hounded in the people behind the building me to come and appear and justify what happened in their newspapers. james murdoch saying
kind of things happened here that happened over there. scotland yard made its ninth arrest in a widening scandal over in britain. how far will this go? joining us, u.s. senator barbara boxer from california. do you think the fbi should investigate the newscorp and rupert murdoch? >> absolutely and senator jay rockefeller, chairman of the committee of which i am a senior member, he joined me and we asked for an investigation by the department of justice and the security and exchange commission. listen, chris, there are two laws that really may be implicated here, that may have been broken here. one is the foreign corrupt practices act that passed in the '70s. one is the so-called wiretap act. and american corporations can't break american laws, and rupert murdoch, according to reports, became an american citizen. his corporation is american, because he wanted to be able to own tv stations. well, the fact is, you have to abide by american law. >> let me ask you, do you believe in he bribed foreign officials? isn't that what we're talking about? his corporation? >> well, it's
paid to scotland yard officers by "news of the world" a violation of federal anti-bribery law. so, there's -- there's multiple fronts on which this is escalating for news corp., on top of the reports today that james murdoch may have to go back before parliament. >> and, mike, is any of this touching the media properties in the united states yet of the rupert murdoch empire, or is all this still stemming from the actions done with the uk media properties? >> well, certainly the computer hacking is an allegation involving a news corp. subsidiary in the united states, so that's the jurisdictional hook there. there's a problem there because it took place seven years ago, outside the statute of limitations, but if there is a pattern of conduct that could be established here, that would be the basis by which the feds could bring charges. but, you know, it's early yet. we got to be cautious. >> all right, mike isikoff, our national investigative correspondent, mike, thanks very much. >> thank you. >>> all right, once every decade, i've been promising you this for days, states redraw the
of the investigation for scotland yard told parliament this week that this investigation is ongoing and it's going to grow. she expects it to widen. there is no limit to it at this point. she did allude to the fact there could be more arrests. the arrest this morning was a 60-year-old former editor of "news of the world." his name is neil wallace. he was also the deputy to andy colson, who was arrested last weekend, a spokesperson for prime minister cameron. there's a lot of interest around his control of the paper and what it did while he was its steward. >> we were just showing new jersey senator frank lautenberg there, who has gone so far as to say look, news corp is an american corporation and could actually face consequences based on american laws, no matter where the crime allegedly happened. we'll have to wait and see how that plays out. stephanie, thank you. >>> a confessed child killer is due in court today. suspect levi aron is expected to be arraigned soon. aron led police to the body of 8-year-old leibby kletzky in his brooklyn apartment. the little boy that he confessed that he smothe
-ranking officers of scotland yard part of the original investigation in to news of the world were themselves victims of hacking. the allegations raising new questions about their handling of the case and they feared reprisals from the paper. the officers will appear at a hearing on that today. >>> wow. so have we heard -- have we heard any response from murdock's people? about these are overblown, they're not true? because you know what, again we've seen before where things are swept up. >> absolutely. especially in london. >> it's a storm, the london tabloids. and you sit there and go, i wonder if this is much to do about nothing down the road. but for the fact that i'm not really hearing a response from news corp. they're usually the most aggressive pitbulls. i mean, i always -- you look at their pr staff, they're remarkable. you sit there in wonderment. but they're completely silent. i'm thinking, wow, where there's smoke, there might be a lot of fire. >> they responded this morning to great britain. they responded by obviously the closure of the -- >> yeah, obviously. >> they responded.
session hours after another high profile member of scotland yard announced his resignation. several of the british papers reporters are accused of hacking into private cellphone accounts and bribing police officers for information. the newspaper was owned by news corp., the parent company of fox news. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg is live in london. what do we know today, amy. >> reporter: the phone hacking case is not just touching the top etc etchelon, but the police force. britain's two top cops resigning, the latest casualty john yates who was the assistant police commissioner, this resignation coming on the heels of the resignation of the commissioner himself yesterday amidst allegations that the original phone hacking investigation back in 2009 wasn't handled thoroughly or properly among other issues, and the police complaints commission has received four referrals about the conduct of different senior police officials in connection with this case. then rebecca brooks, until recently the head of rupert murdoch's british newspaper group arrested yesterday in
, working with its counterparts from scotland yard and the other authorities is basically monitoring their investigation to see whether or not news corp itself was involved in the allegations of the bribery. the fact that you have subsidiary companies of news corp doesn't necessarily mean that the executives themselves in fluz corp knew that this hacking was going on in london. >> other officials or a subsidiary of news corporation, that would be a skriem in tcrim sgliets. >> not necessarily. if those subsidiary companies are based in the uk, they're not going to necessarily be subject to the jurisdiction of the united states. news corp is traded on nasdaq so it's considered a u.s. corporation. if they were involved and knowledgeable of bribery of public officials in the uk, then that would be in violation of the foreign corrupt practices act. that's a felony that could be prosecuted here in the united states for that. >> very quickly because we've got to go, but you sort of wish you were still in the fbi to be investigating this kind of case? or would you just as soon let someone el
of quick headlines for you. scotland yard has made another rest in the scandal linked to the now defunct news of the world. the paper was part of a news international, the u.k. newspaper division of newscorp which, of course, is owned by rupert murdoch and that's the parent company of fox news. well, newscorp apparently will have a response to that coming up. and take a look at this. an austrian man allowed to wear a pasta strainer in his driver's license photo. the man told officials that he's a pastafarian and it's an expression of his religious freedom. really, he's an atheist who was trying to make a point. funny. clayton? >> what i usually wear. thanks, gretchen. it's a county deep in debt. nassau county, new york is already hundreds of millions of dollars in the red. but now, the county wants taxpayers to take on $400 million in additional debt to build a new hockey stadium. for the islanders. this is really a good idea? tom swazy is a former nassau county executive and joins us to talk about it. nice to see you. >> how are you doing? >> how can they get away with this? >> there
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)